Nos tutelles

CNRS UT3

Rechercher




Accueil > Equipes > Archaeology, Genomics, Evolution and Societies (AGES)

Projects | Projets

par Ludovic Orlando - publié le

Projects | Projets

english | français
— 
Horse & Animal Domestication
The Biological, Medical & Socio-Cultural Impact of Colonization
Identifying Novel Reservoirs in the Archaeological Record
Methods in Ancient DNA Research



HORSE & ANIMAL DOMESTICATION

@ copyright Ludovic Orlando

The horse provided us with rapid transportation, an almost unrivaled secondary product that tremendously impacted the politico-economical trajectory of our societies, revolutionizing the circulation of people, culture and diseases. Horse chariotry and cavalry also changed warfare and beyond the battlefield, new equestrian technologies have stimulated agricultural productivity. However, the 5,500 year-long history of horse domestication and management, which transformed the natural evolutionary trajectory of the wild horse into the more than 625 domestic breeds living today, is difficult to reconstructfrom archaeology, history and modern genetics alone. Yet, with archaeogenetics, one can access the genetic information from past individuals and track in great detail past population trajectories. In this project, we leverage the latest advance in ancient DNA research to reconstruct, for the first time, patterns of horsebreeding during the five millennia encompassing the process of horse domestication. Our approach relies on the extraction of ancient DNA from osseous material to reconstruct the complete genome sequence of ancient horses in order to characterize how the genetic makeup of the horse evolved through space and time and how past human cultures forged the modern domestic horse. This work is supported by multiple research programmes, including from the ERC (PEGASUS), France Genomique (BUCEPHALE), Villum Fonden (miGENEPI), IDEX (OURASI).

A number of on-going collaborations extend our methodological approach to other domestic animals (eg. sheep, ANR EvoSheep) and plants (eg. grapes, ANR Viniculture).

Collaborators
Alan Outram (Exeter Univ., Exeter, UK)
Marjan Mashkour, Benoit Clavel, Sebastien Lepetz (MNHN CNRS, Paris, France)
Emmanuelle Vila (Maison de l’Orient, Univ. of Lyon, France)
Francois Pompanon (Univ. of Grenoble, France)
Beth Shapiro (Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, USA)
Arne Ludwig (Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research, Berlin, Germany)
Michi Hofreiter (Postdam Univ., Postdam, Germany)
Anders Albrechtsen (Univ. of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark)
Tomas Marques-Bonet (Univ. Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain)
Agnar Helgasson, Kari Stefansson (deCODE Genetics, Reykjavik, Iceland)



THE BIOLOGICAL, MEDICAL & SOCIO-CULTURAL IMPACT OF COLONIZATION

Yakuts represent the largest ethnic group of the Sakha Republic of Eastern Siberia (Yakutia), with almost half a million of individuals. Although their history remains largely unknown, they are thought to descend from a population that migrated northwards from the Lake Baikal area, following the expansion of the Great Mongolian Empire in the 13th century. Yakutia is the coldest country in the northern hemisphere, with winter temperatures dropping below -70°C and annual temperature amplitudes over 100°C. To survive such extreme environments, Yakuts have developed a traditional lifestyle based on livestock herding, where horses, cattle and reindeer provided means of transport but also sources of meat, milk and clothing. This traditional lifestyle has considerably evolved following the Russian colonization, which first settled within the first half of the 17th century. Russians facilitated access to new food items, in particular the sugar-rich cereals, which increasingly impacted the traditionally protein-rich, meat-driven Yakutian diet over time. The Russian colonization had also a far reaching impact on the social sphere, including the rise of an economical elite in the early 18th century, the reduction of seasonal mobility and the settlement in villages, and the later progressive decline of earlier shamanic religious practices in favor of Christianity. The exposure of the immunologically-naïve Yakut population to Russian germs also resulted in massive epidemiological outbreaks of smallpox, tuberculosis, pertussis, etc., with dramatic demographic impact. The recent history of Yakutia, and the societal and cultural changes that followed Russian colonization, thus provide a natural experiment in which the biological, medical and societal consequences of one major lifestyle transition can be measured in situ. This programme is supported by the ANR LifeChange.

Collaborators :
Eric Crubezy (Univ. of Toulouse, Toulouse, France)
Lluis Quintana-Murci (Pasteur Institute, Paris, France)
Charles Stepanoff (College de France, Paris, France



IDENTIFYING NOVEL DNA RESERVOIRS IN THE ARCHAEOLOGICAL RECORD

@ copyright Y. Billaud (DRASSM)

In the last decade, ancient DNA research has moved from the characterization of minute fractions of the mitochondrial genome and the genotyping of a handful of SNP markers to full genome sequencing. Such advances have been made possible by the rise of increasingly performant yet cost-effective sequencing technologies, the discovery of specific osseous paleontological archives outstandingly rich in endogenous DNA material, and the development of a molecular toolkit tailor-made to the ultrashort and degraded nature of ancient DNA molecules. Yet, the ancient DNA toolkit has almost exclusively been applied to bones, teeth and hair remains. Therefore, the many hundreds of ancient individuals sequenced at the genome-scale consist of mammals to a large extent, mainly humans. Many other potential sources of ancient DNA are, however, present in the paleontological and archaeological record. For instance, mollusk shells and wood material are almost ubiquitous and available in vast amounts. They have provided invaluable information about the past, including growth rate variability related to environmental changes, sclero-/dendro-chronological dating, and paleo-ecological proxies. Shells have been almost completely overlooked, and applying first-generation ancient DNA methods to wood has proved difficult, mostly due to limitations in DNA recovery rates, and the co-preservation of chemical compounds inhibiting classical enzymatic activities. Using molecular methods at the forefront of ancient DNA research, we investigate the potential of mollusk shells and wood remains as novel (meta)genomic archives of the past, aiming at a deeper molecular characterization of past environments, communities, and population trajectories of natural and anthropogenic environmental changes and epidemics. This research is supported by the ERC Treepeace and is a follow-up on the ArcheoSHELL research project, which finished in August 2017 and was funded by the Danish Council for Independent Research.

Collaborators
Antoine Kremer, Christophe Plomion (INRA, Pierroton, France)
Vianney Pichereau, Christine Paillard (Univ. of Brest, Brest, France)



METHODS IN ANCIENT DNA RESEARCH

Our work has contributed to the development of integrative approaches for studying ancient DNA molecules, promoting the field of palaeomics by the merger of biochemistry, molecular biology, genomics and computational biology. In particular, we have pioneered the use of true Single Molecule Sequencing in ancient DNA research and thereby discovered important chemical features of ancient DNA molecules in relation with their post-mortem degradation trajectory. By advancing our understanding of DNA damage processes, we have been able to tune our molecular tools to improve our ability to extract and manipulate ancient DNA molecules. Similarly, we have contributed to a full series of bioinformatic tools and studies, all tailored to improving the sensitivity, the quality and the accuracy of the analyses underlying next-generation sequence data. All our computational tools are distributed under open source licenses, in order to facilitate technology transfer to the community (eg. PALEOMIX, epiPALEOMIX, gargammel, mapDamage, and metaBIT). We have also devised methods to track epigenetic changes over evolutionary times, either directly targeting DNA methylation marks orexploiting indirect proxies of DNA methylation and nucleosome positioning. This resulted in the characterization of the first genome-wide nucleosome and methylation maps from an ancient human individual, paving the way to deeper investigations of the role of epigenetic changes in evolution.


Cheval et domestication animale
Impact biologique, médical et socio-culturel de la Colonisation
Identification de nouveaux réservoirs dans les registres archéologiques
Méthodes de recherche en ADN ancienIdentification de nouveaux réservoirs dans les registres archéologiques

— 


CHEVAL ET DOMESTICATION ANIMALE

Le cheval nous a pourvu avec un moyen de déplacement rapide, une plus-value quasi sans équivalent qui a impacté la trajectoire politico-économique de nos sociétés, révolutionné les modes de circulation des personnes, des cultures et des maladies. Le char à cheval et la cavalerie ont également changé l’art de la guerre et, en dehors des champs de bataille, les nouvelles technologies équestres ont stimulé la production agricole. Toutefois, une histoire de la domestication et de l’élevage du cheval, retracant comment la trajectoire évolutive naturelle du cheval sauvage a été transformée pour aboutir aux plus de 625 races domestiques vivantes actuellement, reste difficile à reconstruire sur la seule base des données de l’archéologie, de l’histoire et de la génétique moderne. Aujourd’hui, avec l’archéogénétique il est possible d’obtenir des informations génétiques issues d’individus vivant dans le passé et de suivre ainsi dans le détail les trajectoires des populations anciennes. Dans ce projet, nous mettons à profit les dernières avancées dans le domaine des recherches en ADN ancien afin de reconstruire pour la première fois, les modalités de la domestication du cheval au cours des 5 derniers millénaires. Notre approche implique l’extraction d’ADN ancien à partir de matériel osseux afin de reconstruire la séquence complète du génome de chevaux anciens et de caractériser comment la composition génétique du cheval a évolué dans le temps et dans l’espace, et comment les cultures anciennes ont façonné le cheval domestique moderne. Cette recherche est soutenue par de multiples programmes incluant l’ERC (PEGASUS), France Genomique (BUCEPHALE), Villum Fonden (miGENEPI), et l’IDEX (OURASI).
De multiples collaborations actuelles permettent d’étendre notre approche méthodologique à d’autres espèces domestiques (ex mouton, ANR EvoSheep et plantes (ex. vignes, ANR Viniculture).

Collaborateurs
Alan Outram (Exeter Univ., Exeter, UK)
Marjan Mashkour, Benoit Clavel, Sebastien Lepetz (MNHN CNRS, Paris, France)
Emmanuelle Vila (Maison de l’Orient, Univ. of Lyon, France)
Francois Pompanon (Univ. of Grenoble, France)
Beth Shapiro (Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, USA)
Arne Ludwig (Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research, Berlin, Germany)
Michi Hofreiter (Postdam Univ., Postdam, Germany)
Anders Albrechtsen (Univ. of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark)
Tomas Marques-Bonet (Univ. Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain)
Agnar Helgasson, Kari Stefansson (deCODE Genetics, Reykjavik, Iceland)



L’IMPACT BIOLOGIQUE. MEDICAL & SOCIO-CULTUREL DE LA COLONISATION

Les Yakoutes constituent le groupe ethnique le plus réprésenté de la république Sakha (Yakoutie) située à l’Est de la Sibérie), avec environ un demi-million de personnes. Bien que leur histoire reste pour une bonne part inconnue, ils sont supposés être les descendants d’une population qui aurait migré depuis l’aire du lac Baikal vers les latitudes Nord à la suite de l’expansion du Grand Empire Mongol au 13ème siècle. La Yakoutie est le pays le plus froid de l’hémisphère Nord, avec des températures hivernales pouvant descendre en deçà de -70°C et des amplitudes thermiques annuelles pouvant dépasser les 100°C. Pour survivre à de tels environnements extrêmes, les Yakoutes ont développé des modes de vie traditionnels basés sur les troupeaux de bétail, où les chevaux, les vaches et les rennes sont des moyens de transport mais également sources de viande, de lait et de vêtements. Ce mode de vie traditionnel a considérablement évolué suite à la colonisation russe qui a commencé à s’établir à la première moitié du 17ème siècle. Les russes ont facilité l’intégration de nouveaux types de nourriture, en particulier des céréales riches en sucre qui ont considérablement impacté le mode alimentaire Yakoute traditionnellement riche en protéine, et basé sur la consommation de viande. La colonisation russe a également fortement impacté la sphère sociale, incluant l’émergence d’une élite économique au début du 18ème siècle, la réduction de la mobilité saisonnière et la sédentarisation dans des villages, ainsi que plus tard le déclin progressif du chamanisme au profit du christianisme. L’exposition de la population Yakoute immunologiquement naïve à des germes russes a également donné lieux des crises épidémiologiques majeures de variole, tuberculose, coqueluche, etc., avec des conséquences démographiques dramatiques. L’histoire récente de la Yakoutie et les changements sociétaux et culturels qui ont fait suite à la colonisation russe fournissent un cas d’étude naturel pour l’analyse in situ des conséquences biologiques, médicales et sociétales de telles transitions de mode de vie. Ce programme est supporté par l’ANR LifeChange.

Collaborateurs :
Eric Crubezy (Univ. of Toulouse, Toulouse, France)
Lluis Quintana-Murci (Pasteur Institute, Paris, France)
Charles Stepanoff (College de France, Paris, France



IDENTIFICATION DE NOUVEAUX RESERVOIRS A ADN DANS LES REGISTRES ARCHEOLOGIQUES

Dans cette dernière décennie, la recherche en ADN ancien est passée de la caractérisation en quelques fractions de minutes du génome mitochondrial et d’une poignée de marqueurs SNP au séquençage total du génome. De telles avancées ont été permises par l’émergence de technologies de plus en plus performantes bien que de moins honéreuses, la découverte d’archives osseuses paléolithiques exceptionnellement riches en matériel ADN endogène, le développement d’outils moléculaires taillés sur mesure pour manipuler les fragments et dégradés que représentent les molécules d’ADN ancien. A ce jour, les outils de l’ADN ancien ont été quasiment exclusivement appliqués à des restes osseux, de dents ou de cheveux. Ainsi, les centaines d’individus anciens séquencés à l’échelle du génome complet correspondent essentiellement à des mammifères, et en particulier des humains. De nombreuses autres sources potentielles d’ADN sont cependant présentes dans les registres paléontologiques et archéologiques. Par exemple, les coquilles de mollusques et les matériaux de bois sont disponibles en grande quantité et ont déjà fourni d’importantes informations sur notre passé, en nous fournissant par exemple des estimateurs des taux de croissance, des outils de datation sclero-/dendro-chronologique, et des indicateurs paléo-écologiques. Si les coquillages ont souvent été laissés pour compte, l’application des méthodes en ADN ancien de premières générations sur les matériaux de bois s’est avérée difficile, essentiellement en raison de la difficulté d’accéder à l’ADN et de la co-préservation de composants chimiques inhibiteurs des activités classiques des enzymes. En utilisant des méthodes moléculaires d’avant-garde en ADN ancien, nous avons testé le potentiel des coquilles de mollusques et des restes de bois comme nouvelles archives (méta)génomiques du passé, avec pour objectif une caractérisation moléculaire plus poussée des environnements du passé, des communautés et des trajectoires de populations face à des changements climatiques et épidémies.

Collaborateurs
Antoine Kremer, Christophe Plomion (INRA, Pierroton, France)
Vianney Pichereau, Christine Paillard (Univ. of Brest, Brest, France)



DEVELOPPEMENT METHODOLOGIQUE EN ADN ANCIEN

Notre travail a contribué au développement d’approches intégratives pour l’étude des molécules en ADN ancien. La promotion des champs des paléo-miques s’est notamment appuyée sur l’approche combinée de la biochimie, biologie moléculaire, des génomiques et de la biologie computationnelle. En particulier, nous avons été pionniers dans l’utilisation des outils de troisieme generation de séquencage de l’ADN. Cela a permis de découvrir d’importantes propriétés chimiques des molécules anciennes en relation avec leurs trajectoires de dégradation post-mortem. L’avance de notre compréhension des mécanismes de dégradation de l’ADN nous a permis d’adapter nos outils moléculaires pour améliorer notre capacité à extraire et exploiter les molécules d’ADN ancien. De même, nous avons contribué à une série d’études et d’outils bioinformatiques, toutes orientées pour améliorer la sensibilité, la qualité et la précision des analyses accompagnant la production de séquences issues des technologies de dernière génération. Tous nos outils ont été développée sous licence de libre échange afin de faciliter le transfert vers la communiquer (ex PALEOMIX, epiPALEOMIX, gargammel, mapDamage, and metaBIT). Nous avons également développé des méthodes pour travers les changements épigénétiques au cours de l’évolution, soit en ciblant directement les traces de méthylation de l’ADN, soit en exploitant indirectement des proxies de la méthylation ADN et le positionnement des nucléosomes. Cela a abouti à la caractérisation des premières cartes des nucléosomes et des méthylations du génome complet d’un individu humain ancien, ouvrant ainsi la voie vers de nouvelles recherches sur le rôle des changements épigénétique dans l’évolution.

Top of the page