Nos tutelles

CNRS UT3

Rechercher




Accueil > Annuaire

Der Sarkissian Clio

Clio Der Sarkissian
Position : CNRS Permanent Resercher (CRCN)
E-mail address : clio.dersarkissian@univ-tlse3.fr
Phone number : +33 5 61 14 55 03

Research Topics
My main research interests focus on using ancient DNA from mollusc shells to investigate the impact of environmental changes on marine communities. Relying on mollusc, microbial and environmental DNA recovered from shells, I am interested in reconstructing the evolutionary and demographic trajectories of molluscs, temporal changes in marine environments and microbial communities, as well as the genetic history of microbial diseases. This work also finds applications in archaeological studies, endangered species conservation, invasive species monitoring, and aquaculture management.

Current Research/Ongoing research
In my on-going projects, I use high-throughput DNA sequencing and metagenomic techniques to analyse ancient shells collected from archaeological sites (e.g., shell middens), sediment cores, and museum collections. My objective is to estimate past changes in the geographical distribution and effective population size of molluscs, characterize their ancient admixture and/or hybridization patterns, and track their genomic adaptive processes. Another aim of my current work is to follow the dynamics of the taxonomic and functional diversity of marine microbial communities, and to detect potential pathogens. My research activities are also oriented towards the characterisation of DNA content and preservation in carbonate shells, and I am developing and applying molecular and computational methods to improve DNA extraction from shells and metagenomic analyses of (highly-) degraded biomolecules from non-model organisms.

Previous research/Ongoing : MSCA project ELITE
Between September 2017 and September 2019, I received funding from the European Union to conduct the Marie Skłodwoska-Curie IF project ELITE (748122) at AMIS. In ELITE, I investigated adaptation of Far East Siberian Yakuts in the course of the 17th-20th century Russian colonization.


ELITE Summary : Adaptation, whereby organisms become fitted to their environment, is a key evolutionary process driving biodiversity. Our understanding of how natural selection impacts genetic diversity has greatly advanced with recent developments in high-throughput DNA sequencing allowing scanning genomes for signals of selection. However, selection can act on other systems, such as the microbiome (the communities of microbes that live within and on us) and the epigenome (the non-genetic modifications of our genomes regulating their expression), as they influence our health and phenotype, and thus our fitness. Although microbiomes, epigenomes and genomes can now be reconstructed, no study has evaluated their relative importance in populations exposed to new selective pressures. This is what ELITE aims at achieving by reconstructing the history of the biological changes undergone by the Yakut people of Far Eastern Siberia after their contact with Russians in the 17th century, and the resulting profound lifestyle transition, diet shifts and massive epidemiological outbreaks. By applying a multidisciplinary approach combining the latest advances in physical anthropology, ancient genomics, metagenomics and epigenomics to a unique collection of cultural and biological material from ancient Yakuts, ELITE proposes an innovative experimental approach in evolutionary biology, which could eventually reveal a possible maladaptation to our modern lifestyle, making us more susceptible to diseases.
A large high-throughput DNA sequencing dataset was generated for 108 ancient Yakut individuals dated to the 16th to 20th century. For these individuals, a massive impact of the Russian colonization could be observed in the archaeological, historical and anthropological records. Preliminary analyses revealed their genomic affinities for present-day populations of Siberia, candidate biological functions deferentially affected by selection and methylation (a type of epigenetic marks), as well as the microbial diversity of the ancient Yakut oral environment.
In addition to revealing the evolutionary origins of an iconic human population, ELITE will be instrumental in current evolutionary medicine debates, in which the “old-friends” and “hygiene” hypotheses postulate the human maladaptation to modern lifestyles as a driver for increased occurrence of diabetes and allergies. By tracking changes in the genome, epigenome and oral microbiome, ELITE will reveal whether a transition to a modern lifestyle can reshape these biological systems, possibly making us maladapted to our current environments and thereby more susceptible to diseases.

Academic background and Research Experiences
2017-2019 : Marie Skłodowska-Curie Fellow, AMIS, UM5288, CNRS, University Paul Sabatier Toulouse, France
2014-2017 : Assistant Professor in (Ancient) Genomics and Metagenomics, Centre for GeoGenetics, Natural History Museum of Denmark, University of Copenhagen, Denmark
2012-2014 : Post-doctoral researcher in (Ancient) Genomics and Metagenomics, Centre for GeoGenetics, Natural History Museum of Denmark, University of Copenhagen, Denmark
2008-2011 : PhD in ancient human population genetics, Australian Centre for Ancient DNA, School of Earth and Environment Sciences, University of Adelaide, Australia
2006-2007 : Research Masters in Industrial Microbiology and Biocatalysis, University Paul Sabatier Toulouse 3, France
2002-2007 : Degree in Biochemical Engineering, Institut National des Sciences Appliquées de Toulouse, France

Selected articles

Der Sarkissian C, Pichereau V, Dupont C, Ilsøe PC, Perrigault M, et al. (2017) Ancient DNA reveals marine mollusc shells as new metagenomic archives of the past. Molecular Ecology Resources. 17, 835-853.

Der Sarkissian C, Louvel G, Hanghøj K, Orlando L (2016) metaBIT, an integrative and automated metagenomic pipeline for analysing microbial profiles from high-throughput sequencing shotgun data. Molecular Ecology Resources. 16, 1415-1427

Librado P, Der Sarkissian C, Ermini L, Schubert M, Jónsson H, et al. (2015) Tracking the origins of Yakutian horses and the genetic basis for their fast adaptation to subarctic environments. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 112, E6889-6897.

Der Sarkissian C, Ermini L, Schubert M, Yang MA, Librado P et al. (2015) Evolutionary Genomics and Conservation of the Endangered Przewalski’s Horse. Current Biology, 25, 2577–2583.

Der Sarkissian C, Allentoft ME, Ávila-Arcos MC, Barnett R, Campos PF, et al. (2015) Ancient genomics. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences, 370, 20130387.

Der Sarkissian C, Balanovsky O, Brandt G, Khartanovich V, Buzhilova A,et al. (2013) Ancient DNA reveals prehistoric gene-flow from Siberia in the complex human population history of North East Europe. PLoS genetics, 9, e1003296.

Web Links
https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Clio_Der_Sarkissian


Clio Der Sarkissian
Statut - Organisme de rattachement Chargée de recherche CNRS (CRCN)
E-mail : clio.dersarkissian@univ-tlse3.fr
Téléphone : +33 5 61 14 55 03

Thématiques de recherche
Ma principale thématique de recherche est axée sur l’utilisation de l’ADN ancien des coquilles de mollusques pour étudier l’impact des changements environnementaux sur les communautés marines. Les coquilles contiennent l’ADN des molllusques, mais aussi des microbes et de l’environnement, permettant de reconstruire les trajectoires évolutionnaires et démographiques des mollusques, les changements des environnments marins et des communautés microbiennes au cours du temps, ainsi que l’histoire génétique des maladies microbiennes. Ce travail peut aussi trouver des applications dans les domaines de l’archéologie, de la conservation des espèces menacées, du contrôle des espèces invasives et de la gestion des aquacultures.

Recherches actuelles
Mes travaux de recherche actuels reposent sur l’utilisation du séquençage ADN à haut-débit et des techniques de métagénomique pour analyser des coquilles anciennes prélevées au niveau de sites archéologiques (ex. amas coquillers), de carottes sédimentaires et de collections de musées. Mon objectif est d’évaluer les changements passés chez les mollusques en termes de distribution géographique et de taille effective de population, d’admixture et/ou d’hybridation anciennes et de processus d’adaptation génomique. Un autre objectif de mon travail est de suivre les dynamiques de la diversité taxonomique et fonctionnelle des communautés microbiennes marines et de détecter d’éventuels pathogènes. Mes activites de recherche sont aussi orientées vers la caracterisation de l’ADN et de sa conservation dans les coquilles carbonatées. Par ailleurs, je développe et applique des methods moléculaires et informatiques dans le but d’améliorer l’extraction d’ADN à partir de coquilles, ainsi que les analyses métagénomiques de biomolecules dégradées des organismes non-modèles.

Recherche précédente / en cours : Projet MSCA ELITE
Entre septembre 2017 et septembre 2019, j’ai reçu un financement de l’Union Européenne pour mener le projet Marie Skłodwoska-Curie IF ELITE (748122) à AMIS. Au cours du projet ELITE, j’ai étudié l’adaptation des Yakoutes du Nord Est de la Sibérie au cours de la colonisation russe entre les 16ème et 20ème siècles.


Résumé d’ELITE : L’adaptation, par laquelle les organismes s’adaptent à leur environnement, est un processus clé de l’évolution de la biodiversité. Notre compréhension de l’impact de la sélection naturelle sur la diversité génétique a considérablement progressé avec les récents développements en séquençage d’ADN à haut débit permettant de scanner les génomes à la recherche de signaux de sélection. Cependant, la sélection peut agir sur d’autres systèmes, tels que le microbiome (les communautés de microbes qui vivent à l’intérieur et sur nous) et l’épigénome (les modifications non génétiques de nos génomes régulant leur expression), car ils influencent notre santé et notre phénotype, et donc notre fitness au sens évolutif du terme. Bien que les microbiomes, les épigénomes et les génomes puissent maintenant être reconstruits, aucune étude n’a évalué leur importance relative dans les populations exposées à de nouvelles pressions sélectives. C’est ce que vise ELITE en reconstituant l’histoire des changements biologiques subis par les Yakoutes après leur contact avec les Russes au 16ème siècle, ainsi que la profonde transition de leur mode de vie, les changements de régime alimentaire et les épidémies de grande envergure. En appliquant une approche multidisciplinaire combinant les dernières avancées de l’anthropologie physique, de la génomique, de la métagénomique et de l’épigénomique anciennes à une collection unique de matériel culturel et biologique d’anciens Yakuts, ELITE propose une approche expérimentale innovante en biologie évolutive, qui pourrait éventuellement révéler une possible maladaptation de notre mode de vie moderne, nous rendant plus susceptibles aux maladies.
Un important jeu de données de séquençage d’ADN à haut débit a été généré pour 108 anciens Yakoutes datant du 16ème au 20ème siècle. Pour ces individus, les archives archéologiques, historiques et anthropologiques ont révélé un impact considérable de la colonisation russe. Des analyses préliminaires ont révélé leurs affinités génomiques pour les populations sibériennes actuelles, des fonctions biologiques possiblement affectées de manière différentielle par la sélection et la méthylation (un type de marques épigénétiques), ainsi que la diversité microbienne de l’environnement oral des Yakuts anciens.
En plus de révéler les origines évolutives d’une population humaine emblématique, ELITE contribuera aux débats actuels sur la médecine évolutive, dans lesquels des hypothèses postulent que la mauvaise adaptation humaine aux modes de vie modernes est un facteur favorisant la survenue de maladies, comme le diabète et les allergies. En suivant l’évolution du génome, de l’épigénome et du microbiome oral, ELITE révélera si une transition vers un mode de vie moderne peut remodeler ces systèmes biologiques, ce qui pourrait nous rendre inadaptés à notre environnement actuel et, donc, plus vulnérables aux maladies.

Parcours de recherche
2017-2019 : Post-doctorante Marie Skłodowska-Curie, AMIS, UM5288, CNRS, University Paul Sabatier Toulouse, France
2014-2017 : Professeur Assistant en Génomique et Métagénomique anciennes, Centre for GeoGenetics, Museum d’Histoire Naturelle du Danemark, Université de Copenhague, Danemark
2012-2014 : Post-doctorante en Génomique et Métagénomique anciennes, Centre for GeoGenetics, Museum d’Histoire Naturelle du Danemark, Université de Copenhague, Danemark
2008-2011 : Doctorat en génétique des populations humaines anciennes, Australian Centre for Ancient DNA, École des Sciences de la Terre et de l’Environnement, Université d’Adélaïde, Australie
2006-2007 : Master Recherche Microbiologie et Biocatalyse Industrielles, Université Paul Sabatier Toulouse 3, France
2002-2007 : Diplôme d’Ingénieur en Génie Biochimique et Alimentaire, Institut National des Sciences Appliquées de Toulouse, France

Bibliographie

5 Articles sélectionnés

Der Sarkissian C, Pichereau V, Dupont C, Ilsøe PC, Perrigault M, et al. (2017) Ancient DNA reveals marine mollusc shells as new metagenomic archives of the past. Molecular Ecology Resources. 17:835-853.

Der Sarkissian C, Louvel G, Hanghøj K, Orlando L (2016) metaBIT, an integrative and automated metagenomic pipeline for analysing microbial profiles from high-throughput sequencing shotgun data. Molecular Ecology Resources. 16:1415-1427

Librado P, Der Sarkissian C, Ermini L, Schubert M, Jónsson H, et al. (2015) Tracking the origins of Yakutian horses and the genetic basis for their fast adaptation to subarctic environments. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 112, E6889-6897.

Der Sarkissian C, Ermini L, Schubert M, Yang MA, Librado PL et al. (2015) Evolutionary Genomics and Conservation of the Endangered Przewalski’s Horse. Current Biology, 25, 2577–2583.

Der Sarkissian C, Allentoft ME, Ávila-Arcos MC, Barnett R, Campos PF et al. (2015) Ancient genomics. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences, 370, 20130387.

Der Sarkissian C, Balanovsky O, Brandt G, Khartanovich V, Buzhilova et al. (2013) Ancient DNA reveals prehistoric gene-flow from Siberia in the complex human population history of North East Europe. PLoS genetics, 9, e1003296.

Voir en ligne : Bibliographie / Publications
https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Clio_Der_Sarkissian